From the category archives:

Victorian

June 2017

by Juliana on June 20, 2017

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April 2017

by Juliana on April 15, 2017

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March 2017

by Juliana on March 15, 2017

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Victorian Burled Walnut/Marble Top Chest

by Juliana on January 15, 2010

Victorian Burled Walnut/Marble Top Chest
New Arrival

New to the shop, this gorgeous Victorian chest of drawers with burled walnut drawer fronts and a marble top can dress up any room.  As pretty as it is, it can also look very handsome in a less fussy decor.  It measures 41″ wide, 36″ high, 18″ deep. SOLD

Also, come in to check out the many new items that have been added to the shop this week.

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Hand-painted dresser: the original shabby chic

by Juliana on January 7, 2010

Remember when all your friends went “shabby chic?” This lovely dresser recalls an earlier mania over painted furniture in the 1920s. This piece, most likely from the 1890s, was probably painted back then.

It’s a three-drawer pine dresser with a marble top, painted to match the rest of the dresser. It would be comfortable  – and quite useful – in your traditional or Victorian home.

Approximate dimensions: 45″ wide, 18″ deep, 29″ high. Utterly charming. $595.

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Mary, Queen of Scots, and her forbidden love

by Juliana on January 7, 2010

Poor David Rizzio (pictured, with mandolin). He had the misfortune to serve as the secretary to Mary Stuart, also known as Mary, Queen of Scots. That he was Italian, Catholic and quite possibly her lover didn’t help matters.

Stuart’s husband (and also her first cousin) Henry Stewart Lord Darnley took offense at one or all of these traits and murdered him on March 9, 1566. That this was done in front of Stuart probably didn’t do much for the marriage. To wit: Darnley was murdered soon after.

The key takeaway from this passion play is that our contemporary soap operas can’t hold a candle to British history. These people played rough!

This striking chromolithograph depicts Stuart first encountering Rizzio, while in the background two ladies of the court exchange confidences as another man, resplendent in his Elizabethan collar, looks on. Chromolithography was an early means to reproduce paintings that became popular after the 1840s. While chromolithographs were reproductions, they were collected and treated as fine art by their owners, and today are relatively rare due to deterioration from acid mattes and frames.

This print is in fine condition for its age, measuring approximately 51″ by 42″ and handsomely framed with original glass. $295.

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